Being the best at what we do

Posted: October 16, 2014 by Chynnie in Opinions
Tags: , ,

Every Architect strives to be good in various ways. Every Architect has different skills in which we build in order to be better at what we do. Our basic skill being to design, (which should be more of a passion for Architects). We build up several other skills ranging from CAD abilities, building construction, construction drawings, project management etc. These skills we would say are also basic skills of an Architect. Apart from these skills, it is generally known that Architects work really hard, and to be successful as an architect, you have to work hard and be very dedicated, you have to be really creative and smart, you have to be passionate about Architecture, you have to always improve your skills and also be a people person, that is a very likable person. All these should help in being really good at what we do.

But how about being the best at what we do? We often neglect a basic skill, which all architects must possess to be the best. This is the Architect – Client relationship. The ability to understand your client and be able to translate his wants into your drawings. A good architect wouldn’t actually design what his client wants but what he needs. This doesn’t mean you shouldn’t listen to your client, you should listen attentively, and ask lots of question as to how your clients lives. You have to consider your clients needs, their well being, their lifestyles and also very importantly, their budget. Only then can you design what your client loves. Only then can you become the best at what we do.

www.peerutin.co.za

Architect – Client relationship                                    Photo credit: http://www.peerutin.co.za

We must know that every client is unique, and desires something the other client doesn’t. For example in a simple stairs design in a duplex, client A wants a door at the stairs on the first floor and client B doesn’t for different specific reasons. Client A wants to be able to go straight to his bedroom or the family lounge on the first floor from the garage, while client B is like, what the hell is that, i want to be able to go into my sitting room first, relax a bit before i go upstairs. All clients are unique, don’t impose a design on them. Ask questions, find out about their lifestyles and do a design that would suit their life styles. Your design might be the most functional design ever, but if it doesn’t suit your clients life style, that design has failed.

Sometimes though, a client might desire something not functional. It is in our position as an Architect to advice the client on what works, design a functional space according to his needs and he would love it and love you more. The same goes in designing the building facade. How do you know what kind of exterior to design for your client? In most cases, the client says i want my house  like the house down the road or like the house in front of a particular magazine. You could simply give him pictures of different types of exterior designs and from his choices, you know exactly the type of exterior he wants. Simple rule, keep your client in the know, involve him in the design process and watch him smile. Your aim should always be to keep him happy.

So it is important we build up this skill especially if you specialize in residential architecture. Learn to listen to your client and translate his needs into your drawings. Like i mentioned earlier, you don’t give him what he wants, but what he needs and you can only know that by thoroughly understanding him, which comes with a very good Architect – client relationship. This i am certain would stand you out as the best in what we do.

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