#ArchiTalks – Story telling in Architecture

Posted: October 21, 2014 by Chynnie in #ArchiTalks, Architecture
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If you are active on twitter and follow Architects who maintain Architecture blogs like Bob Borson of http://www.lifeofanarchitect.com and Enoch Sears of http://www.businessofarchitecture.com, you would have noticed sometime last week a trend in the hash tag #ArchiTalks. The topic was Storytelling in Architecture, or that’s my own topic because they all had their different topics. I am not actually gonna write on this today, i would eventually…….or might not, because after reading from all the links i am going to share today, i am sure there would be nothing new to learn from me.

So in summary, all these wonderful Architects where talking about the connection between Architecture and story telling. Bob says Architects are natural story tellers, i agree with him, how else do we convey our thought process to our clients if not via story telling. Below are links to every posts on #ArchiTalk series, written by different architects. I am going to include an excerpt for every link, click the link to read the full post. You should read each and everyone of them, they are quite educative and interesting, and at the end of the read, if you cant tell your own story as an Architect, i am sure you would go learn how to or might have learnt from the read.

Please enjoy this interesting reads from different Architects, different topics but same theme – Architects, Storytelling.

 

  • Bob Borson, @bobborson – Life of An Architect

             The other way that architects are great storytellers, is that we develop these narratives as a mechanism to educate someone on our                      thought process. Since a lot of what architects do is esoteric, being able to articulate my reasons for solving a problem in a particular                 way – without being condescending – is an important skill. I need to walk people through my design process in a way that they can                     understand the end result in a more appreciative manner – it works way better than telling someone:

            “I’m the professional here, just do what I’m telling you to do.”

Architectural Storytelling – It’s My Thing

  • Marica McKeel, @ArchitectMM – Studio MM
    “Storytelling is the best way to get people excited about what you do. The more your readers/listeners/viewers can relate to your story, the more they will engage with you and your business.”

Take the Time to Tell Your Story.

  • Matthew Stanfield, @FiELD9arch – FiELD9: architecture

            “There are stories of Architecture. There are stories about Architecture. There are stories in Architecture.

             Every building has a story. Every building tells a story. These are frequently two different stories. One is about how a building came to               be. The circumstances of it’s existence. The other is about the community in which it exists.”

Stories in Architecture

  • Enoch Sears, @businessofarch – Business of Architecture
    “You need to craft a story. And the story needs to contain the typical elements of a story: a hero, a protagonist, a conflict, a reversal, a resolution. Think of the Bible or the Koran – these compelling stories have shaped the fates of nations. Your’s doesn’t need to be as dramatic, but it must appeal to emotion.”

The Secret Ingredient To Convincing Anyone To Do (Almost) Anything

  • Lee Calisti, AIA, @LeeCalisti – Think Architect
    “What if we looked at architecture itself as a story? Not too many people besides architects engage metaphoric thinking when it comes to describing architecture. That’s too bad. But if we all love to tell stories and we all enjoy listening to stories, wouldn’t it be great to inhabit a story? (pun intended…sort of)”

architecture as storytelling

  • Evan Troxel, @etroxel – Archispeak Podcast / TRXL
    ” I do believe that architecture can tell a story, and that’s how I have chosen to write about this topic. But I don’t think it usually tells the same story to everyone. In fact, this is why I’m writing about this specific project. Much like a song or a work of art, different people interpret the lyrics, image, sculpture, etc. in different ways. I know that I have my own story of the first time I visited a great work of architecture, and I also know that it’s probably different than yours. One thing I like about architecture is how permanent it is. As I go back and revisit them, they are the same but my internal story about it changes over time because I change over time. I see it in new ways each time .”
    It’s Their Story
  • Lora Teagarden, @L2DesignLLC – L² Design, LLC
    ” In the architectural profession, building are our stories and become our legacies. Authors have written compositions. Musicians have songs. We have the design of our structures. The Architects of the past created structures as legacy. They were buildings of honor, of thoughtful design and construction, because they valued the time and material required for the creation of the structures.”
    Architectural Storytelling: The Legacy of Design
  • Collier Ward, @collier1960 – Thousand Story Studio
    ” There are several other aspects of the Architecture-Storytelling relationship that give us a unique platform for telling edifying stories. I can’t speak for insurance agents, accountants, or plumbers, but architects have a profound relationship with stories. Let’s tell them well! Remember Plato’s words – and take this advice from story-master Joseph Campbell: “If you’re going to have a story, have a big one, or none at all.”
    Architecture and Storytelling are Forever Linked
  • Cormac Phalen, @archy_type – Cormac Phalen
    “It is the generational aspect of storytelling that is most appealing to me.  In our profession; architects rarely ever design buildings with the notion that this is a building that will only last their lifetime.  We have the opportunity to set the stage for many life times of stories if we are lucky.”
    THE GENERATIONAL STORY – ARCHITECTURE AS STORYTELLING
  • Nicholas Renard, @coterenard – Cote Renard Architecture
    I am a listener. I much prefer to let my clients (and others) be the storytellers. I enjoy when they willingly tell the stories of their lives and when they get going…I sit back and listen. I don’t take notes, I give them my full attention and listen with no distractions. If I took notes I couldn’t observe their body language as they tell their stories, an aspect that almost carries the same weight as the words they say. They deserve my full attention and I need to give it to them. After all, what they have to say is so very important, it is a fundamental piece for my inspiration and an important part of my design process.”
    The Story of a Listener
  • Andrew Hawkins, AIA, @hawkinsarch – Hawkins Architecture, Inc.
    “But my favorite architectural story is one that evolves constantly over the life of a project. This is the story told by the Project-Construction Documents. This is a story that, as an architect, I am often the only one who gets to fully see, develop, write and rewrite as the project progress.”
    Architectural Story Books

 

 

 

Photo credit: http://www.slideshare.net

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Comments
  1. Lady P says:

    I thoroughly enjoyed the read. I learnt alot and could relate with the storytelling in architecture on many levels. As Architects have to skillfully sell our ideas every time we are working with a client and the people that join us to bring our ideas to reality.

    Like

  2. OUN says:

    Nice read. I should visit the blog more often.

    Thumbs up Chynnie!

    Like

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